War diaries online

https://qormuseum.org/2018/01/14/qor-wwii-war-diaries-now-completely-online/

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Forgotten no more

The reason I have been writing since 2009.

Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire - No. 62 “Beaver” (Operational) Base)

History has forgotten most of the unsung heroes. Every veteran who came back alive had stories to tell, but most kept them hidden from friends and family fearing they would not believe them or that those stories were too painfull to share.

interrogation after a sortie

Since 2009 I have been writing about such stories.

The first was about a sixteen year-old kid who had lied about his age to enlist in the Royal Canadian Navy back in 1944. He was my wife’s uncle who told for the first time in 2009 he was a stoker on HMCS Athabaskan. I was never able to verify his story, but I believe he never made up a story about HMCS Athabaskan who was torpedoed on April 29th, 1944.

This morning someone wrote me and asked me if I was related to Donald Hickson about whom I had dedicated this blog in 2016.

https://raf203squadron.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/paying-homage-to-pilot-officer-donald-hickson/

Hi Chris,

I…

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The Impatient Virgin Revisited

The Impatient Virgin Revisited

About VF(N)-101

A tribute to Richard "Chick" Harmer and US Navy Night Fighter Squadron VF(N)-101

Note

I wrote this exactly a year ago. That was before I decided to pay homage to 39 pilots.

colorised version

Colorised version (still work in progress)


Foreword

I am not the author of the article The Big E’s Impatient Virgins. Dr. Bartlett is the author. He is a retired professor of history at Cape Cod Community College. His article was written after he interviewed Richard Emerson Harmer.

This week, thanks to Robert Brunson who flew with Richard Harmer, I contacted “Chick” Harmer’s son who allows me  to use some of his father’s war memorabilia.

This is why I will edit Dr. Bartlett’s article.

***

Source

http://m.usni.org/big-es-impatient-virgins

The Big E’s Impatient Virgins

By Randolph Bartlett

In January 1944, Lieutenant Commander Richard Harmer’s VF(N)-101 became one of the Navy’s first carrier-based night fighter squadrons.

vfn-101

Once at sea, however, Harmer had an uphill climb getting permission for his pilots to fly their radar-equipped Corsairs…

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2017 – A Look Back Over The Last Three Years.

About someone passion for preserving the past

Aviation Trails

As 2017 draws to a close and another year passes, I’d like to look back at some of the highlights of the blog so far.

Since starting the site, way back in 2014, I have learned a lot about Britain’s airfields, their design and construction, and the men and machines that flew from them. What started as a record of memories has turned into a passion of history and hopefully, a dedication to all those who served, fought and died at these places. I have also seen how gradually, over time, many of these historic sites have sadly disappeared, beaten by the onslaught of time, the developers pen, and the ploughs of the industrial farmer evermore determined to draw out more crops from his expanding domain.

What were once massive military sites covering a vast acreage of land, homes to several thousand people who were all doing ‘their bit’ for…

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December 22, 1944 The Battered Bastards of Bastogne

December 22, 1944 The Battered Bastards of Bastogne

Every story has to be told.

Today in History

The largest German offensive of the western front burst out of the frozen Ardennes forest on December 16, 1944, aiming to drive a wedge between British and American forces and to capture the Belgian port of Antwerp, vital to the German need to re-supply. It was called “Unternehmen Wacht am Rhein”.  “Operation Watch on the Rhine”.

The tactical surprise was complete, allied forces driven back through the densely forested regions of France, Belgium and Luxembourg. Wartime news maps showed a great inward “bulge” in the lines, and the name stuck. The Battle of the Bulge was the largest and bloodiest battle fought by the US in WWII, fought in the harshest winter conditions in recorded history and involving 610,000+ Americans.

54626e3c46ec3.image

The seven roads leading to Antwerp converged in Bastogne, in what the Germans called “Straße Oktopus”, “Road Octopus”. The town was strategically indispensable to the German drive on Antwerp, and…

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We’ll Meet Again… A Love Story

About a love story

Harry James Goodwin DFC DFM

A Love Story

This photo is part of Harry James Goodwin’s collection. 

Jimmy has he was called by others when he was with 78 Squadron had a girlfriend when he was stationed in England. I believe this photo was taken at Linton-on-House late 1943 or early 1944.

On what occasion was it taken that I don’t know.

What I know is that Jimmy’s daughter would like to know more about Jimmy’s girlfriend.

Hi Pierre,

My Dad is in the front middle of this photo and the girl I told you about is kneeling behind Dad with her hands on his shoulders. I would love to know who she was. I know you will find her, no pressure LOL
Regards, Gayle

A Love Story

We'll meet again - a love story Harry's girlfriend

We'll meet again - a love story Harry's girlfriend zoom in

I have asked Gayle for more information sending her this montage.

A Love Story identification

Hi Pierre, I think the girl you circled in green is the one Dad was going out with, the one in red…

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